Sardines on prescription: “Sardine & Watercress Pâté”

At the Ladies Lunch Group at Princess Alice Hospice today, ladies with metastatic breast cancer met to have lunch and listen to my presentation on

‘Cooking on Prescription from the Doctor’.

I made this pâté in front of them to demonstrate how easy it is to prepare a healthy meal with readily available ingredients. Perhaps the most exotic ingredient in it is turmeric, which is however very easy to find and is one of the most important spices for health. A number of studies have demonstrated its’ antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties. More research is underway to investigate its’ potential against cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, diabetes and other illnesses.

So, another straightforward recipe to make in your kitchen. You will need a food processor for this one, which will do most of the hard work for you. The combination of the ingredients in this recipe make it a most healthy food to have as a snack or main meal with a side salad or some cooked vegetables. Full of omega 3 fatty acids, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and hundreds of other micronutrients that work together to help your body and mind function well.

Sardine & Watercress Pâté

Tinned sardines in springwater or brine
One small baked sweet potato
A handful of watercress leaves or cabbage
Parsley and chives (optional)
1 tsp turmeric
1-2 tsps mustard
Lime juice
Pepper

Method
Add all the ingredients in a food processor and mix until smooth
Serve on rye or wholemeal bread with a side salad of tomatoes and watercress.

Καλή όρεξη (enjoy your meal, in Greek)

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Green soup on prescription: “Watercress & Broccoli Soup”

A wonderful, tasty soup that is full of healthy ingredients. It won’t take you more than 20 minutes to prepare it. Just make sure you don’t overcook the greens. Add some parsley also if you have it. Eat it with some white fish and you have everything you need for a whole meal, full of nutrients that your body and mind need to function well.

Watercress & Broccoli Soup

Broccoli cut into small pieces
A handful of watercress leaves
A handful of spinach leaves
1 small sliced onion
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1cm piece of fresh root ginger, peeled and cut into small pieces
Olive oil
Thai fish sauce
Lime juice
Salt and pepper

Method
Gently sweat the onions, garlic, ginger, fish sauce and tamari sauce in a little water.
Add the broccoli and enough water to cover and bring to the boil. Simmer until the broccoli is just tender.
Add the watercress and spinach and leave to boil for another minute.
Blend the soup in a food processor until smooth and thick.
Add oil, some lime juice, season with salt and pepper and serve.

Bon appétit (enjoy your meal, in French)

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Olympic Gold Diet

My latest article and recipe in the Help the Hospices Information Bulletin

In Ancient Greece it was forbidden to export figs (called ‘syco’ in Greek). Furthermore, people were encouraged to expose those who secretly exported figs for profit. Some used this as an opportunity to falsely accuse others of this crime, to take personal revenge. This is where the modern word sycophant comes from.

Eleni’s article-Hosp Info Bul Jan 2012

JEWELLED PORRIDGE – AN ANCIENT RECIPE MADE NEW

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Porridge is a traditional Scottish food. I took this nutritious dish and added a Mediterranean twist to it with some extra beneficial, fragrant and colourful ingredients.  

Saffron is a precious spice with numerous health benefits, including anti-tumour activity and anti-depressive effects, which are currently being researched. You can find good quality saffron in a Persian or Middle Eastern shop where it is often cheaper than the high-street supermarkets.

The ingredients in this recipe go back to Antiquity, although perhaps Hippocrates would have used barley instead of oats. If you choose the Hippocratic version, then soak the barley overnight and follow the steps below:

Ingredients:

1 cup rolled oats

2 cups milk (goat’s, soya or rice) or 1 cup milk and 1 water

3 green cardamom pods

1 cinnamon stick

1/3 tsp ground saffron (or a small pinch of saffron threads roughly cut with your fingers). Alternatively, make ‘saffron water’ the previous day by adding 1 cup boiling water to the saffron threads and leave overnight.

1 tbsp raisins

1 tbsp goji berries or other dried fruit

For the sprinkling on top:

1 tsp cinnamon powder

1 tbsp freshly ground mix of poppy, flax and sunflower seeds

1 tbsp pumpkin and sesame seeds

fresh berries or pomegranate seeds, when in season

1-2 tbsp good quality, cold-pressed honey (avoid heated honey as the process of heating destroys its healing nutrients)

Directions: 

Bring the milk and water (or saffron water) to a boil in a non-stick pan.

Add the oats, raisins and goji berries and mix well.

Add the cinnamon stick, cardamom pods and ground saffron.

Cook slowly on low heat.

Simmer until the mixture reaches a creamy consistency.

Spoon the porridge into individual serving bowls.

Sprinkle the ground seeds, cinnamon powder and berries.

Serve hot with milk and honey.

Enjoy the smell and the colours.

Taste it and appreciate the textures.

It will give you energy to start your day.